By Mark Marino http://thehubofhockey.net/

Boston Bruins report card: No. 20 Daniel Paille

 

(S. Babineau/Getty Images) No. 20 Daniel Paille

Everyday, Thehubofhockey.net will be handing out report cards for the 2010-11 NHL Stanley Cup Champions, Boston Bruins.

In order of jersey number, each individual will be showcased and given out a final grade for their regular season and playoff  efforts.

Today we have PK guru and left-winger, Daniel Paille.


Name: Daniel Paille
Position: Left wing
Shoots: Left
Age: 27
Height: 6’0″
Weight: 200 lbs.
Contract: $1.075 million through 2011-12

Line combinations (dobberhockey.com)
EV: Gregory Campbell/Shawn Thonrton 51.69% and 57.81% in post season
PK: Campbell 63.75% and 84.67% in post season

2010-11 NHL season stats:
Regular season: 43 GP, 6-7–13, plus-3, 28 PIM, 48 SOG
Playoffs: 3-3–6, plus-2, 4 PIM, 25 SOG

Anthony’s take: When the casual Bruins fan looks back on the Bruins Stanley Cup Championship season, people will think of guys like Zdeno Chara, Tim Thomas, and Nathan Horton who really led the Bruins throughout the postseason. Anyone who watches hockey for more than goals, hits, and big saves knows the importance of guys like Daniel Pallie, and without Pallie the Bruins don’t win the cup.

Not much of an offensive threat, (13 points) Pallie was a force on the Bruins penalty kill. Playing on the Bruins fourth line Pallie didn’t get much playing time, averaging just 11:18 of time on ice, but Pallie gave it his all out there every shift setting the tone for the other three lines with his physical play.

The one sour spot on his otherwise successful season was when Pallie was suspended for four games after a blindside open-ice-hit on Dallas Stars forward Raymond Sawada.

Final grade: B

Marino’s grade: Often a healthy scratch — and even being the center of attention at one point this regular season on being assigned to AHL Providence to clear cap space — Paille shined in the post season. He played his fourth-line role extremely well: creating energy alongside Campbell and Thronton…and if he had more of a finishing touch and softer hands, Paille’s goals could have easily been doubled in both regular season play and playoffs. He used his assets, primarily his speed, to his advantage throughout the season, but it was the PK where No. 20 earned his keep.

Almost shades of Derek Sanderson, Paille not only became a cornerstone to the Bruins shutting down Vancouver’s once potent power play, but he often played aggressively on the shorthand, using his speed and stick-work to create scoring opportunities.

He averaged 1:57 shorthanded time on ice in the playoffs (third among forwards) and pitched-in with a shordhanded tally.  While he may have received a near failing grade in the regular season, Paille rightfully deserved his name etched in Lord Stanley’s Cup.

Final grade: C+

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Posted on June 25, 2011, in Boston Bruins and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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